Thursday, February 26, 2015

NESTING BALD EAGLE PAIR in SAN BENITO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

MY HEART CARTWHEELS


Just about thirty days ago I arrived home from three months in the Southern Hemisphere. First thing I did was head to the BALD EAGLE NEST to check up on "Bob & Bernadette," as I named this pair. B & B were the first pair of Bald Eagles to nest in San Benito County, beginning in 2004. In the dimming evening light, I struggled to "see" the nest. Much had changed since my departure last October. Hillsides were green instead of brown, for one thing! However, I could not find the nest — and, the horror finally struck me — the 11 year old nest had become too heavy and the branches finally gave way! Last year, we estimated that the nest was 18 to 20 feet across and probably 10 feet deep. Each year, I've watched as B & B rebuilt the nest. They begin doing this in late October. So, when I left the country, all was well with the nest fully completed for (hopefully) another successful season.

Bob and Bernadette are considered an "advanced" couple  — tending the same nest for nearly 8 months of the year, every year steadily for 11 years. They lay eggs earlier than most Bald Eagles, even at this latitude. Consequently, the young hatch earlier. I
n all years, save one, they have managed to fledge not one, but two young. To date, they have successfully raised some twenty Bald Eaglets! This, in spite of the persistent drought. One reason for their great success is that they primarily rely on ground squirrels for food. (I confirmed this by watching for many hours). They do not rely on waterfowl, nor fish. 

The nest is on private property and the owners are well aware of it. A handful birders and locals know about the nest and have been extremely guarded about revealing the location. I cannot thank everyone enough for this. Some Bald Eagles are greatly disturbed by people and abandoned their nest. A big part of B & B's success depends on you, too. You know who you are.

For nearly three weeks, I've had a case of "empty nest" syndrome, missing them more than I thought possible. They were such a regular part of my life. I would see a Bald Eagle, and think that is was "Bob" or "Bernadette" — and, I was pretty sure. Like longing for a lost love, I'd drive through their valley home. Once I saw Bob sitting in a large tree, clutching a dead ground squirrel for half an hour. This raised my curiosity. Was he bringing food to Bernadette? There was no doubt in my mind that they would carry on, building a new nest, either this year, or next. However, the decades' long nest was so convenient for watching and such a part of my life. 

Last night I made the drive once again, hoping against hope. I was elated to see BERNADETTE ON A NEW NEST! My heart did cartwheels! The new nest is just about in the same tree, but is only about one fifth the size of the old, crashed nest. There is another nest in the tree. Perhaps, they built it first. From what I could tell, she appeared to be sitting on egg(s). She looked as though her head was tucked in and she was sleeping. I'm crossing my fingers on this and will return to check on things — practically, daily. (Okay, I get obsessed with them). My notes say that they were incubating on 20 February in 2013. So, timing is right. Stay tuned —

Many, many thanks to all who guard this nest! 
Happy Trails,
Debi Shearwater

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

IMAGES OF THE DAY by WILL BROOKS: FEBRUARY 22, 2015 MONTEREY BAY

Shearwater Journeys's leader, 16 year old Will Brooks, captured these images on our February 22, 2015 Monterey Bay seabirding trip. Will is a junior at Gunn High School and our newest leader, although he was not leading on this day, but simply enjoying the marine life with his dad who is also a birder. Will has been birding for eight years already — half of his life! He began photographing birds a year ago. Last summer he had the opportunity to enjoy Maine's seabirds through the Audubon Coastal Maine Bird Studies Camp on Hog Island. Will says that the camp gave him a chance to explore a small island covered with nesting Atlantic Puffins, guillemots and terns. He confesses to being fascinated and excited about seabirds.
WILL BROOKS

BRANDT'S CORMORANT in high breeding plumage
BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER
RHINOCEROS AUKLET
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL
TWO BROWN BOOBIES
PACIFIC FULMAR
PACIFIC FULMAR
BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS
BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS

SHEARWATERS FOREVER
DEBI SHEARWATER
debi@shearwaterjourneys.com

Monday, February 23, 2015

WINTER SEABIRDING: MONTEREY BAY PELAGIC TRIP REPORT: FEBRUARY 22, 2015

BLUE SHARK

Howdy, Seabirders,
It has been a long time since we have offered a winter pelagic trip. This February 22, 2015 Monterey Bay seabirding trip was offered by Shearwater Journeys in conjunction with the Pacific Seabird Group Annual Meeting in San Jose, California although the trip was open to anyone. It sold out quickly. We enjoyed a very warm and sunny day! Hardly seemed like winter, especially considering that many parts of the USA are experiencing an "Arctic Freeze." Highlights of the trip included: excellent views of BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; PINK-FOOTED, SOOTY and BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS; 2 BROWN BOOBIES; PIGEON GUILLEMOT; COMMON MURRE; SCRIPPS'S MURRELET; RHINOCEROS and CASSIN'S AUKLETS; TUFTED PUFFIN. Marine mammals included: GRAY and HUMPBACK WHALES; LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN; HARBOR PORPOISE; SEA OTTER; CALIFORNIA SEA LION; HARBOR SEAL. Quite possibly, the rarest marine animal of the day was one BLUE SHARK. We seldom observe this once common shark these days. The sea surface temperature was a warm 58 F. The fish finder was showing lots of mackerel and rock fish. All images below, copyright, Mark Rauzon. Please do not use without permission. 
HEERMANN'S GULL, just outside of the harbor.
SOUTHERN SEA OTTER

 MARK RAUZON & KUNIKO OTSUKI
Kuniko, from Japan, does research with Hiroshi Hasagawa on the endangered Short-tailed Albatross. However, the Black-footed Albatrosses on this trip were the first albatrosses she has ever seen!
Mark Rauzon has been seabirding with Shearwater Journeys for decades, dating back to at least December 20, 1987 when the Pacific Seabird Group held their annual meeting in Monterey. 
To view more of Mark's images, please click, here
TWO BROWN BOOBIES
For more than a year now, Brown Boobies have staged a major invasion along the California coast. As many as nine have recently been reported on the Farallon Islands, some carrying nesting material.
 Gerry McChesney, manager of the Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Kim Nelson. Abe Borker, Ph.D. candidate at UCSC, on the right. Debi Shearwater and Harry Carter in the background.
PELAGIC CORMORANT in high breeding plumage.
 BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER
 GRAY WHALE
Many thanks to all of the folks, from near and far who joined our seabirding trip, including Japan, Ecuador, Sweden and England. The leaders on this trip were; Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Dave Pereksta, Gerry McChesney, Abe Borker, John Garrett, and Debi Shearwater. 

THE COMPLETE SPECIES LIST FOR SHEARWATER JOURNEYS'S MONTEREY BAY FEBRUARY 22, 2015 TRIP FOLLOWS: Note that this was a shorter trip of only 4.5 hours, all in Monterey County.

BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 5
NORTHERN FULMAR- 3
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 1
SOOTY SHEARWATER- 1
SOOTY/SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER- 1
BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 14
*BROWN BOOBY- 2, maybe 3
BROWN PELICAN- 10
BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 125
PELAGIC CORMORANT- 45
SURF SCOTER- 70
BLACK TURNSTONE- 2
SURFBIRD- 2
HEERMANN'S GULL- 40
MEW GULL- 5
CALIFORNIA GULL- 20
HERRING GULL- 8
WESTERN GULL- 75
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL- 10
COMMON MURRE- 90
PIGEON GUILLEMOT- 2
SCRIPPS'S MURRELET- 2, unusual for winter
CASSIN'S AUKLET- 3
RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 30
TUFTED PUFFIN- 1
SEA OTTER-
CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 100
HARBOR SEAL- 6
GRAY WHALE- 9
HUMPBACK WHALE- 5
LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 150
HARBOR PORPOISE- 1
OCEAN SUNFISH- 1
BLUE SHARK- 1 *rarely seen in recent decades

To view a calendar of all of the Shearwater Journeys's 2015 fall seabirding trips, please click here. BTW, we are offering two trips to the Farallon Islands this season: August 8 & October 18. These trips are experiencing heavy bookings right now! Blue Shark image credit: NOAA.

SHEARWATERS FOREVER,
DEBI SHEARWATER
debi@shearwaterjourneys.com



Saturday, September 6, 2014

HOLY MACKEREL: MONTEREY BAY PELAGIC SEABIRD TRIP, SEPTEMBER 5, 2014


Monterey Bay seabirds put on a spectacular show on Shearwater Journeys's September 5, 2014 pelagic trip. Within thirty minutes of departing the dock, we were surrounded by tens of thousands of shearwaters and feeding whales! 
Highlights included: PACIFIC MACKEREL chasing anchovies to the surface of the sea where shearwaters were snatching them up! Important seabirds we observed included: six species of shearwaters: 27,000 SOOTY SHEARWATERS; 250 PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS; 1200 BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS; 6 BULLER'S SHEARWATERS and 1 FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER; all three species of jaegers: POMARINE, PARASTIC and LONG-TAILED JAEGER; SOUTH POLAR SKUA; a brilliant and complete selection of rocky shorebirds on the Coast Guard Jetty: 2 BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS, 1 WANDERING TATTLER, 7 BLACK TURNSTONES and 6 SURFBIRDS; a springing of COMMON TERNS; nursery schools of vocalizing father/chick pairs of COMMON MURRES,  the last of the PIGEON GUILLEMOTS, a few RHINOCEROS AUKLETS and tiny handful of CASSIN'S AUKLETS. The HUMPBACK WHALES continue to put on quite a show with lunge-feeding at the surface. Two different herds of dolphins included LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS and SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS. Top all of this off with some very fine weather and we can all agree it was a completely outstanding day at sea on Monterey Bay!
Within thirty minutes of leaving the harbor, we found ourselves inspecting thousands and thousands of shearwaters sitting in rafts at sea, so stuffed with food that they did not want to fly. Amongst these rafts, I found 2 leucistic Black-vented Shearwaters and one leucistic Sooty Shearwater. ELEGANT TERNS were soaring ultra high in the sky, probably searching for food. Then, we saw shearwaters diving and fish "breezing" across the top of the sea! These anchovies were being pursued from below by the predatory mackerel! Amongst these rafts of shearwaters, leader Rick Fournier spotted a MANX SHEARWATER! Everyone on the boat, including many photographers, was able to get great views of this rarely spotted Pacific shearwater. In fact, it was one of the best views I've had in many years. We continued searching the shearwater flocks and then headed north to Santa Cruz County and the old haunts of storm-petrel flocks. A couple single BLACK STORM-PETRELS made passes at the boat. Jaegers and the SOUTH POLAR SKUA flew by, as well as BULLER'S SHEARWATERS. We stopped and I dumped out some menhaden oil, and leader Jennifer Green spotted a FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER soaring over the slick. A few minutes later, it was spotted sitting in a flock of a dozen or so PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS
Our very capable captain, "Tinker," above, catching a MACKEREL for us to see.
Here is a video of PACIFIC MACKEREL at the MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM. 
Seabirds are not evenly distributed at sea. They are found in patches — wherever the food is located!
As everyone has heard me say, "It's all about food!"
We love to honor celebrations at sea on our pelagic trips. 
This beautiful couple, Christine Miller and Chantel Fletcher celebrated their 13th Anniversary together!
Many thanks to all of the folks who joined our trip from near and far, including Finland and England. Many thanks to Wally & Lois Goldfrank and their friends in the Santa Cruz Bird Club! 
The leaders on this trip were: Jennifer Green, Nick Levendosky, Rick Fournier and Debi Shearwater.

THE COMPLETE SPECIES LIST FOR SHEARWATER JOURNEYS'S MONTEREY BAY SEPTEMBER 5, 2014 PELAGIC SEABIRDING TRIP FOLLOWS:
MONTEREY/SANTA CRUZ COUNTIES

BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 6/13
NORTHERN FULMAR- 0/1
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 157/159
*FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 0/1
BULLER'S SHEARWATER- 2/4
SOOTY SHEARWATER- 26,000/100
*MANX SHEARWATER- 3/0
BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 1200/0
BLACK STORM-PETREL- 0/3
BROWN PELICAN- +
BRANDT'S CORMORANT- +
PELAGIC CORMORANT- 2/0
BLACK OYSTERCATCHER- 2/0
WANDERING TATTLER- 1/0
BLACK TURNSTONE- 7/0
SURFBIRD- 6/0
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 29/17
SOUTH POLAR SKUA- 0/1
POMARINE JAEGER- 1/2
POMARINE/PARASITIC- 1
PARASITIC JAEAGER- 6/3
LONG-TAILED JAEGER- 0/2
HEERMANN'S GULL- +
CALIFORNIA GULL- +
WESTERN GULL- +
ELEGANT TERN- 120/12
COMMON TERN- 8/6
COMMON MURRE- 225/25
PIGEON GUILLEMOT- 2/0
CASSIN'S AUKLET- 4/8
RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 4/8
SEA OTTER- 8
CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 130
NORTHERN FUR SEAL- 1
HARBOR SEAL- 4
HUMPBACK WHALE- 25
SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 25
LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 40, separate herds
OCEAN SUNFISH- 1

WE ARE IN THE MIDST OF 11 DAYS OF TRIPS IN A ROW!
JUMP ON BOARD with SHEARWATER JOURNEYS!




Monday, August 25, 2014

SILVER DAY AT SEA: MONTEREY BAY AUGUST 22, 2014

Shearwater Journeys's Monterey seabirding trip, August 22, 2014 began in the morning with breaching HUMPBACK WHALES, and ended late afternoon with more of the same. We headed south to SOBERANES CANYON and southwest offshore which turned out to be a great decision. There was a light swell and breeze from the south. We encountered greasy, flat, silver seas offshore which made spotting wildlife easy. Highlights included: BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS, including one leucistic individual; the first BULLER'S SHEARWATERS for Monterey this fall; close up views of SCRIPPS'S MURRELET; first of fall ARCTIC & COMMON TERNS; spectacular encounters with PARASITIC JAEGERS STEALING FISH FROM SABINE'S GULL; and amazing moments with OCEAN SUNFISH (Mola mola) SUCKING IN BY-THE-WIND-SAILORS! The HUMPBACK WHALE show continues, as do the RISSO'S DOLPHINS.
All images by Beth Hamel.
Please do not use without permission.
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON fishing at the dock in the morning.
A Category I hurricane off Baja produced a light swell and breeze from the south. So, I decided to head southwest hoping that this would influence seabirds to move in our direction. That seems to have happened, and I'm betting this will continue over the coming days. The sea surface temperatures (SST's) ranged from 61 to a hot 65 F throughout the day!
I spotted a MINKE WHALE right off Point Pinos, but this HUMPBACK WHALE, above, was the first whale that everyone on board observed.
Off Asilomar Beach, we encountered the a large flock of BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS
We carefully look through these flocks for any "odd" shearwaters.
These are inshore shearwaters, dwelling mostly on the Continental Shelf. 
I spotted this LEUCISTIC BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER, above and below!
We had ample time to study it while it was sitting on the water in the flock, and once it flew. A fast fly-by of such a shearwater can cause a lot of confusion. In the past, I've seen completely white Black-vented Shearwaters. Actually, this individual is in the flock image, above. Can you find it?
Continuing south to Carmel Bay, we had views of the great Crocker Mansion, below.
A flock of migrating DOWITCHERS passed us by as we headed offshore.
Offshore, we encountered a lot of marine life, including this flock of RED PHALAROPES
At this time of year, Red Phalaropes are more commonly found offshore, while Red-necked Phalaropes are found inshore. During winter storms, Red Phalaropes can be blown to shore, and "wreck" on beaches.
As reported previously, we continue to encounter high numbers of OCEAN SUNFISH, Mola Mola.
We witnessed a rare sighting: the Ocean Sunfish sucking in BY-THE-WIND SAILORS! Ocean Sunfish eat jellies, but this is the first time I've seen them eating the Sailors!
They sucked them in like a vacuum cleaner!
OCEAN SUNFISH are the heaviest of the bony fishes, weighing up to 5,000 pounds. 
They are covered with parasites and often "invite" gulls to pick on these, as seen below. 
See more about OCEAN SUNFISH with images, at Jackie Sones's blog, here.
A RISSO'S DOLPHIN, below, with an oddly folded dorsal fin caused me to take a second look. This individual was traveling with other Risso's Dolphins. Notice the scars on the body. 
See Jackie Sones's Risso's Dolphin images from this day, here
BULLER'S SHEARWATERS put on a good show. 
Notice the greasy, glassy-smooth, silver seas! 
Both COMMON & ARCTIC TERNS passed us in small flocks, offshore. A few LONG-TAILED JAEGERS were chasing the terns. COMMON TERN, below.
In the image below, four PARASITIC JAEGERS chased a SABINE'S GULL!
Much screaming and vocalizing was going on between the jaegers and gull!
One of the PARASITIC JAEGERS closes in on the SABINE'S GULL!
Finally, the SABINE'S GULL DROPS ITS FISH & THE PARASITIC JAEGER SNAPS IT UP MID-AIR!
Click on the image: that's the fish midway between the two birds! 
PARASITIC JAEGER, above. 
POMARINE JAEGER, above. 
 One SCRIPPS'S MURRELET was found. This individual gave us considerable debate as to the identification. While the posture is more like Craveri's Murrelet, the rounded tail and short, thick bill are good field marks for Scripps's Murrelet. The bird appeared blacker, but I attribute that to the brighter sunlight (most days are quite gray). Also, the white chin and throat point more toward Scripps's Murrelet. Murrelet experts, especially Todd McGrath states that the white chin is not the best field mark and that he has never seen a Craver's Murrelet with a white chin. (He's also looked at specimens at the San Diego Natural History Museum. No Craveri's Murrelets show white chins). We were, all, very happy to have such wonderful views of this tiny alcid from the south.
More Scripp's Murrelet images from this day, here. 
This beautiful day ended with a distant breaching HUMPBACK WHALE! 
We stayed out a little bit longer, owing to such great encounters with marine life!
Truly, a SILVER DAY AT SEA!
Many thanks to all of the folks who joined us, from near and far. 
The leaders on this day were: Scott Terrill, Rick Fournier, Jennifer Green, Debi Shearwater.

THE COMPLETE SPECIES LIST FOR SHEARWATER JOURNEYS'S AUGUST 22, 2014 MONTEREY BAY PELAGIC TRIP FOLLOWS:
ALL SIGHTINGS FOR MONTEREY COUNTY:

BLAC-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 38
NORTHERN FULMAR- 2
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 355
BULLER'S SHEARWATER- 9
SOOTY SHEARWATER- 520
BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 415
ASHY STORM-PETREL- 2
BROWN PELICAN- 17
BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 705
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- 4
PELAGIC CORMORANT- 20
BLACK TURNSTONE- 2
DOWITCHER SP.- 35
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 135
RED PHALAROPE- 18
POMARINE JAEGER- 1
PARASITIC JAEGER- 9
LONG-TAILED JAEGER- 8
HEERMANN'S GULL- 60
CALIFORNIA GULL- 15
WESTERN GULL- 485
SABINE'S GULL- 24
ELEGANT TERN- 110
COMMON TERN- 14
COMMON/ARCTIC TERN- 3
ARCTIC TERN- 5
CASPIAN TERN- 1
COMMON MURRE- 235
PIGEON GUILLEMOT- 3
CASSIN'S AUKLET- 3
RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 42
SEA OTTER- 4
CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 200
NORTHERN FUR SEAL- 18
HARBOR SEAL- 12
MINKE WHALE- 1
HUMPBACK WHALE- 34 
SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 8
RISSO'S DOLPHIN- 56
DALL'S PORPOISE- 10
OCEAN SUNFISH- 27
BY-THE-WIND-SAILOR- ++
EGG YOLK JELLY- 2
SEA NETTLE- 1

MONTEREY SEABIRDS
with
SHEARWATER JOURNEYS
Our upcoming Monterey Seabird Trips with leaders:
SEP. 5: Rick Fournier, Nick Levendosky, Jennifer Green
SEP. 6: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill
SEP. 9: Tom Johnson, Rick Fournier
SEP. 10: Tom Johnson
SEP. 11: Jennifer Green
SEP. 12: Tim Miller, Dena Spatz
SEP. 13: ALBACORE TRIP: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Jennifer Green
SEP. 14: Clay Kempf
*SEP. 25: Jon Dunn, Nick Levendosky, Jim Danzenbaker
*SEP. 26: Kenn & Kimberly Kaufman, Scott & Linda Terrill
*SEP. 27: Scott & Linda Terrill, Jim Danzenbaker, Jennifer Green
*SEP. 28: Rick Fournier, Marissa Ortega-Welch, Courtenay Ray
OCT. 4: Nick Levendosky, Jennifer Green
OCT. 11: Nick Levendosky, Rich Fournier

* These trips are operated in association with the Monterey Bay Birding Festival. 
Popular leaders, Scott & Linda Terrill will present a seabird workshop, on Thursday, September 25 from 3:30 to 5 p.m.
KENN KAUFMAN will present the keynote talk on Saturday, September 27 at 7 p.m.
Sign up for the pelagic trips with Shearwater Journeys, directly. 

The ALBACORE TRIP, SEP. 13, departs from Monterey at 5:30 a.m. and returns at 5:30 p.m. and goes far offshore in search of rare seabirds!
Compliment your Monterey trip with a HALF MOON BAY pelagic trip (next one: SEP. 7), or jump on board one of our BODEGA BAY (SEP. 1 & 19) trips, especially if you are looking for storm-petrels! 
SILVER DAYS AT SEA FOREVER,
DEBI SHEARWATER
debi@shearwaterjourneys.com



Thursday, August 21, 2014

TRIP REPORT: HALF MOON BAY, AUGUST 17, 2014

BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS, the common albatross at this time of year.
This is a trip report for Shearwater Journeys's pelagic seabirding trip from Half Moon Bay, August 17, 2014. Compared to the August 16th trip, the seas had picked up a fair amount — not horrible, but just enough to make finding and viewing seabirds more difficult. Hence, you'll notice fewer numbers of seabirds on this list compared to August 16th. This is why we always recommend doing more than one trip. Just as birding on land can be effected by weather, so can the same thing happen at sea. Best to not put all of one's eggs in one basket, relying on only one day at sea. In fact, most of the folks on board had already done our Monterey trip on August 15, or the August 16 Half Moon Bay trip. Everyone agreed that it was a pleasant day at sea, nonetheless. We spent most of our time near the 100 fathom line. Nonetheless, as Steve Rottenborn's images show, we saw a good selection of marine life!
SOOTY SHEARWATER, a trans-equatorial migrant.
BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS, calling! They make high pitched whistles.
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER, about to take off, showing white wing linings and white breast, two-toned bill. 
RISSO'S DOLPHINS are being found on nearly every trip.
WILSON'S STORM-PETREL often comes into the chum slicks whereas Black and Ashy Storm-petrels do so less often. 
STELLER'S SEA LION, a Federally Endangered Species, often hangs around the weather buoy.
Many thanks to all the wonderful birders who joined Shearwater Journeys on this day at sea. The leaders were: Steve Rottenborn, Steve Tucker, Jim Danzenbaker, Debi Shearwater.

THE COMPLETE SPECIES LIST FOR SHEARWATER JOURNEYS'S AUGUST 17, 2014 HALF MOON BAY PELAGIC TRIP FOLLOWS:

TOTALS ONLY:
RED-THROATED LOON- 5
BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 53
NORTHERN FULMAR- 4
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 352
SOOTY SHEARWATER- 240
BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 8
WILSON'S STORM-PETREL- 6
ASHY STORM-PETREL- 2
BLACK STORM-PETREL- 23
BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 35-
PELAGIC CORMORANT- 5
BLACK OYSTERCATCHER- 4
WHIMBREL- 4
BLACK TURNSTONE- 10
SURFBIRD- 2
DOWITCHER SP.- 10
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 148
SOUTH POLAR SKUA- 2
PARASITIC JAEGER- 1
HEERMANN'S GULL- 1 juvenile
WESTERN GULL- +
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL- 1
COMMON TERN- 2
COMMON/ARCTIC TERN- 2
COMMON MURRE- 1952
PIGEON GUILLEMOT- 4
RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 24
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD- flock of 3!
CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 20
STELLER'S SEA LION- 2
NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL- 1
HUMPBACK WHALE- 2
RISSO'S DOLPHIN- 12
PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN- 6
HARBOR PORPOISE- 24
OCEAN SUNFISH- 40

Color banded BROWN PELICAN, one of many on the jetties. 
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS often follow in the wake of our vessel, allowing great photography opportunities. 
The pelagic BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD!

SHEARWATERS FOREVER,
DEBI SHEARWATER
debi@shearwaterjourneys.com